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Growing Bamboo General discussion - Identification, selection, propagation, care

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  #1  
Old 20th April 2007, 12:51 PM
genatac
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: USA - New York, NYC
Posts: 2
Did my roof deck bamboo survive the winter?

Hello,
I live in NYC and have bamboo growing on my roofdeck- or I did...not sure its still alive. I don't have any new shoots, but I do have green-looking stalks, with totally dead leaves. I did not wrap them this winter, as they made it thru last winter fine without anything, and this was a very warm winter, but I'm a little nervous, 'cause they don't look so great- how do I know if they're dead? Should I cut them back? Any advice appreciated,
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 20th April 2007, 01:23 PM
Mark Meckes
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: USA - Texas, Austin
Posts: 2,374
Hi genatac,
Do you know what kind of bamboo you have?
This will help in knowing it's cold hardiness.

There are varying stages of cold hardiness/survival of culms:

1) Planting retains green leaves, some may become winter burnt, and culms are replaced with new leaves.

2) Leaves become parched and drop off, culm remains green and tiny buds on side branches remain viable. Culms refeaf in spring.

3) Planting lose all leaves, culms remain green though branch leaf buds are dessicated - a parched beige color. Culm branches don't releaf, or scant leaf regrowth. New but often smaller culms emerge in spring.

4) Planting loses all leaves, some culms may remain green. Leaf buds dessicated and don't produce new leaves. Extreme cold temperatures kills rhizome buds, combined with soggy spring soil causing rhizome rot and death of plant.
This condition can be excaberated if the bamboo has been growing in an above ground container without insulation from the cold.

Your situation will be 2, 3 or 4.
Check the tiny leaf buds on the branches and see if they have begun to swell and elongate.
Depending on the species, leaf buds should begin to grow within the next few weeks. They will start growing first, before new shoots emerge.

Mark
Mark Meckes - www.bamboocraft.net

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  #3  
Old 22nd April 2007, 07:04 AM
genatac
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: USA - New York, NYC
Posts: 2
Hi Mark,
I don't know the variety. The leaves all turned white, and towards the top of some of the culms, it gets pretty yellow and dead-looking. I cut alot of the dead branches off yesterday, but I didn't notice buds. I sure hope it comes back, because it's pretty packed into its planter. When bamboo is cut down, does the remaining culm die, or will it grow from where it was cut?
Thanks,

Genata
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  #4  
Old 29th April 2007, 07:18 AM
Mark Meckes
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: USA - Texas, Austin
Posts: 2,374
Hi Genata,
If you'd like help to try identifying your bamboo you can upload pics with your post.

Quote:
When bamboo is cut down, does the remaining culm die, or will it grow from where it was cut?
A bamboo shoot grows to it's ultimate height and diameter in the first 2+ months after it emerges. Thereafter it never gets any taller or larger in diameter, but will grows new leaves from side branches annually (if the leaf buds survive the winter).

So the answer to your question is ... generally speaking ...

If a culm is partially cut back, it will only produce new growth from buds on the side branches. (Some hardy clumpers and also tropical bamboos are a little different in that they may sprout new branches from buds at the culm nodes)

If a culm is cut to ground level this culm will not resprout. (again, some tropical bamboos can grow small sprouts at the culm base but not temperate bamboos)
Temperate (cold climate) bamboos rely on new shoots to grow from buds which sprout from underground rhizomes. Usually, if a bamboo planting is cut to the ground, or if the culms are defoliated and do not grow new leaves, provided the rhizomes did not get killed, they will produce numerous smaller and thinner shoots, and with luck, some larger shoots.
The number, density or spacing and size of the new shoots will depend on the health and viability of the rhizomes.
As rhizomes get older, ie, after a few years, they begin to lose viability, which is why a bamboo needs to annually grow new rhizomes for future generations of shoots.
In this way both the above ground culms and below ground rhizomes are cyclic in nature.

Mark
Mark Meckes - www.bamboocraft.net

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  #5  
Old 17th May 2007, 09:47 AM
Will_Holding
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA - New York, Huntington
Posts: 2
I am near NYC, and I've seen an unusual amount of "winter burn" on all of the bamboo this year, particularly the yellow groove. I fertilized at the very beginning of March and went on vacation for three weeks. When I returned, much of the bamboo had completely browned off, which startled me since I thought I overfertilized.

However, I've been noticing a real change this year all around, the Bamboo in my area (central Long Island) is all brown, and I went out East to Sag Harbor two days ago and noticed three groves out there with the same symptoms. I was discussing it with one of the grove owners who also said he had never seen it burn back so badly (25 years growth).

I'm guessing we had an unusual weather pattern sometime in early to mid march that did it. I'm wondering if anyone else in our area would like to comment on this?

Some of my culms are pushing new shoots and some are not. My bamboo is 2nd year transplant and originally rootballs of 3-4 mature stalks. The first year nearly every plant pushed up between 1-4 new shoots. This year, the less affected plants are pushing up as many as seven new shoots, but many are not shooting at all (yet).

The less affected plants were burned from the tip to about 1/2 the leaf, the more affected plants lost all leaves but have new ones coming in for the most part. About 10 percent of the stalks have died completely, but in each case there are stalks in the same plant that have survived, so I don't know whether this is natural attrition.

Anybody in NY with similar conditions?
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  #6  
Old 18th May 2007, 03:05 PM
cngodles
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA - Pennsylvania, Leechburg
Posts: 348
I'm from Western Pennsylvania and just about all bamboo from this area had the brown leaf burn this year. Mine just shed their leaves and grew new ones. If you don't have at least green buds by now, you may not recover the existing culms.
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