PDA

View Full Version : Gluing bamboo for outdoor use


GREGMW
20th May 2006, 01:35 AM
Hi,

I am new to the forum and working with Bamboo,although I have done a bit of woodwork.

I am interested in making some "outdoor" Water features and ornamental garden pieces , but I am not sure what type of glue and fixings to use to join the pieces together.

Also what do you use to seal it and stop it splitting.

I have done a search of the site/internet but couldn't find any thing.

Thanks

Regards

Greg

Mark Meckes
20th May 2006, 03:06 AM
Hi Greg,
Here's a thread on Waterproof glues for bamboo in wet conditions (http://www.bamboocraft.net/forums/showthread.php?t=1313)

Also what do you use to seal it?

What finish do you use to seal your bamboo?
... would make a good title for a New thread hint hint :)

... and stop it splitting?

Do you mean fixing a split or preventing the bamboo from splitting?

Mark

GREGMW
20th May 2006, 03:46 AM
Thanks Mark for your reply,

I really want to stop it splitting after I finish it.

Regards

Greg

Mark Meckes
21st May 2006, 01:46 AM
Hi Greg,
We have to learn from woodworkers what glue they have used for different applications.
I don't know of any glue that has been specially formulated and marketed for bamboo ..

But nonetheless bamboo is wood-like, with the exception of the waxy outer coating, which is tough to bond to unless scraped off.
I have seen little crafty items not intended for out-door all-weather conditions glued culm surface to surface using a hot glue gun or other hot glue, which I guess melts the waxy surface on contact and helps create a tighter bond.

For example ...
This bamboo holiday ornament
http://www.bamboocraft.net/gallery/data/528/thumbs/985circlesandhalfsorna.jpg (http://www.bamboocraft.net/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=1544&cat=528)

Imagine the possibilities if there was some kind of inexpensive superglue that could permanently bond two culm surfaces together!

The only way I'm familiar with is to scrape off the waxy coating and scratch the surface at the contact point, and if the contact point is also an area that is put under stress during use, it should also be fitted together using some kind of joint that of itself can hold the pieces in place.
Then there's the many tying and binding methods that can be used on their own or in combination with the above.

And then there's duct tape! :)

What type of bamboo do you have to work with, and up to what diameter?

Here's a thread about ...
How to prevent bamboo from splitting (http://www.bamboocraft.net/forums/showthread.php?t=129)

...which I've just read and will reply to soon with some more thoughts on the subject.

Oh, and ...

The inside wall surface of bamboo is culmprised of a hard layer of material (varies with species) that (at least to me) resembles that of hard gourd.

To glue the metal pin to this bamboo broach I scratched the gourdy surface with a knife and used a silicon glue, which has proved to be quite durable.

http://www.bamboocraft.net/gallery/data/528/thumbs/1Mvc-211f.jpg (http://www.bamboocraft.net/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=693&cat=528)

This broach is also worn outside and in all weather conditions, but, okay, not in the same context you were inquiring about ;)

The glue I used for this was called StixAll ... but really, there are many types of silicon based glues out there.
... In the building or plumbing dept you might get more bung for your buck, or the arts and craft section where basically the same product may be packaged smaller and priced higher.

GREGMW
22nd May 2006, 02:53 AM
What type of bamboo do you have to work with, and up to what diameter?



Thanks Mark,

I am not sure what type of Bamboo it is but it is around 35mm (about 1.5 inch) round.

I picked up some Polturathane Glue (Gorrilla Glue -I think you guys call it) and that seems to be holding.I did scrape it back and wiped it over with some cleaner.

This is a great place to learn.Thanks

Regards

Greg

Mark Meckes
22nd May 2006, 03:26 AM
Thanks for finding the site! I really enjoy hearing from others working with bamboo.
Feel free to show pics of your works in progress too, if you want to.

...and let us know what doesn't work so we can learn from your mistakes ;)

Is your bamboo imported or domestically grown.?

I'm just curious, that's all, bit like a woodworker asking if you're using Oak or Pine.
When it come down to the nitty gritty, it doesn't matter what it is or how you do it so long as it suits your purpose.
But on the other hand, if we found that you're working with the same species as I or someone else's using, it would be even more interesting to compare notes. :)

Mark
PS I fixed the broken link in previous post about How to prevent bamboo from splitting (http://www.bamboocraft.net/forums/showthread.php?t=129), but I'll wait till I hear if you're using imported dried bamboo or domestic/green harvested poles before commenting.

GREGMW
22nd May 2006, 04:15 AM
Is your bamboo imported or domestically grown.?

I'm just curious, that's all, bit like a woodworker asking if you're using Oak or Pine.
When it come down to the nitty gritty, it doesn't matter what it is or how you do it so long as it suits your purpose.
But on the other hand, if we found that you're working with the same species as I or someone else's using, it would be even more interesting to compare notes. :)


I am not sure what it is Mark.I went down to a Nursery that sells Bamboo plants and they had some dried poles there...If I can find out I will let you know but I think it probably a local species.??

I have had a look around here and some of the things that have been made are great.

Regards

Greg

Mark Meckes
24th May 2006, 06:42 AM
Does any of your bamboo show branch stubs at the nodes?
If so, does it appear if there is one main branch or 2 branch/stubs?

My first real fling working with bamboo was harvested from a giant clump of bamboo growing somewhere in the hills above Bondi Beach, in Sydney.

Maybe one of these days I'll find out what species it was that I first worked with. :)

Mark

GREGMW
27th May 2006, 03:51 AM
Does any of your bamboo show branch stubs at the nodes?
If so, does it appear if there is one main branch or 2 branch/stubs?



Yes,the poles have had branches on them and it looks like one main branch.

Its interesting when you start taking notice of different pieces. I saw some at the local hardware today and the wall thickness was only about 2mm.

The stuff I have has a wall thickness of about +5mm.

Regards

Greg

Mark Meckes
28th May 2006, 07:15 AM
Ah yes, well thicker walls suggests it might be a subtropical > tropical clumping species ... maybe a Bambusa species.

I see the North Sydney Council has "Rhizomatous Bamboo" on their noxious weeds list (http://www.northsydney.nsw.gov.au/www/html/2964-ochna---rhizomatous-bamboo.asp) :(

They show a pic of Phyllostachys ... probably... P. aurea ...
(one of my favorite weeds)

Well, this is a sure sign that there's someone around town with free bamboo for harvest :)
Some will even pay for a "grove management service" :)

Mark